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MIC Teaching for Inclusion Seminar Series

About

The aim of the ‘MIC Teaching for Inclusion Seminar Series’ is support and share knowledge with the wider teaching community to help with opportunities to support an ethos and practice diversity, inclusion and integration in the classroom and schools.

The ‘MIC Teaching for Inclusion Seminar Series’ will be hosted by MIC on a biweekly basis, offered online through MS Teams. The sessions will be recorded and placed on the MIC website. 

See below for the autumn 2022 schedule. Links to register for each seminar will be available closer to the time. For further details on any of the sessions please email EducationOffice@mic.ul.ie

The Place of Music in the Intercultural School 

Date & Time: 20 September, 7pm

Presented by: Dr Ailbhe Kenny, Department of Arts Education and Physical Education (AEPE)

This talk explores the place and potential of music within diverse schools. Musical participation in Irish primary and post-primary schools is examined as a potential means to develop and enhance belonging, intercultural dialogue and shared understandings. At the same time, the talk also debates the potential for othering and stereotyping through music. The discussion will focus in particular on the opportunities that musical participation can offer to newly arrived children in schools. 

This seminar has now concluded and is available to view in the Recordings tab to the right or directly at this link: Seminar 1 Recording Link

The Embracing Diversity Nurturing Integration Programme (EDNIP): Sharing learning on developing a model of integration in primary schools

Date & Time: 4 October, 7pm

Presented by: Dr Ruth Bourke & Áine Lyne, EDNIP

EDNIP is a partnership initiative that works with 5 DEIS Band 1 primary schools to promote and support the integration of migrant children and families into school and community life. Across the 5 schools there are children from 46 different nationalities, speaking 36 languages and from 17 religious backgrounds. This workshop will share key learning and strategies developed from the EDNIP model on promoting integration in primary schools.

This seminar has now concluded and is available to view in the Recordings tab to the right or directly at this link: Seminar 2 Recording Link

Starting from where the child is at: Insights and Strategies from the TEAL Project, Limerick 

Date & Time: Postponed will be Rescheduled

Presented by: Dr Fíodhna Gardiner-Hyland, TEAL 

With over 200 languages spoken in Ireland (NCCA, 2015) and rising numbers of newcomer international students, there is an urgent need to ‘start from where the child is at’ in accommodating the diverse language and literacy needs of children with English as an additional language (EAL) in primary and post-primary school classrooms. Drawing on research-based evidence (Kirwin and Little, 2020; Gardiner-Hyland, 2021) and the experiences of one Limerick-based community of practice (CoP): ‘The ‘TEAL Project’ (a collaboration between the ‘OSCAILT Schools Network’ and Mary Immaculate College, Limerick), this lecture outlines authentic insights and strategies of primary and post-primary teachers in dealing with learners with English as an additional language (EAL), particularly at the beginning stage of their language learning. Using visual examples, it draws on language and literacy practices that reach into, out from and across schools within the TEAL project, to support the teaching of EAL learners and their families. Its culturally and linguistically responsive collaborative, holistic approach could potential to be replicated in other locations across the country.

What will participants learn?

  1. Identify with and understand the complexities of the role of the primary teacher in supporting EAL learners in Irish schools, at a time of significant demographic, curricular and policy reform in Irish primary education.
  2. Recognise that we ‘start from where the child is at’ and identify initial strategies toward becoming a school of sanctuary.
  3. Reflect on own experiences as a language learner and teacher of languages.
  4. Become familiar with where to access multilingual resources.
  5. Recognise the importance of local communities of practice for supporting teachers of EAL learners.
  6. Take action now, using the ‘Strategies Checklist for Teaching with a Multilingual, Multi-literate and Multicultural lens’.

Register for Starting from where the child is at: Insights and Strategies from the TEAL Project, Limerick.

Universal Design for Learning: Designing flexible inclusive learning environments for ALL learners

Date & Time: 15 November, 7pm

Presented by: Jean Reale, Centre for Learning Enhancement & Academic Development (LEAD)

By using the UDL framework educators can accept learner variability as a strength to be leveraged, not a challenge to be overcome. (Rose & Meyer, 2002).  

In this session we will explore everyday technologies through the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) lens to unlock their assistive technology potential. This practical session will support teachers in identifying language supports for ESL students to create fully inclusive environments.

Register for Universal Design for Learning: Designing flexible inclusive learning environments for ALL learners.

Re-telling Red Riding Hood around the world: Exploring European and global perspectives in the intercultural classroom.

Date & Time: 29 November, 7pm

Presented by: Dr Sabine Egger, Department of German Studies & Irish Centre for Transnational Studies, with Florence Ajala and Alicja McCloskey, Faculty of Education, MIC

This lecture introduces practising and future teachers to examples of international fairy tales and their adaptations in visual media in different cultural contexts. It explores their potential as a pedagogical tool in the primary and secondary classroom. The narratives discussed can help learners to develop their intercultural and language awareness, but also to deal with traumatic experiences. These aims are becoming more and more important in intercultural and multilingual classrooms in today’s Ireland. (“Intercultural” is used in a wider sense here, applying recent approaches based on new research on alterity and transculturalism).

Register for Re-telling Red Riding Hood around the world: Exploring European and global perspectives in the intercultural classroom. 

Discussing migration in Irish classrooms: Strategies and resources for exploring migration with pupils

Date & Time: 13 December, 7pm

Presented by: Donnah Vuma, Doras Luimní, MASI (Movement of Asylum Seekers Ireland) and ECIYC (Every Child is Your Child) and Dr Brighid Golden, Department of Learning, Society, and Religious Education (LSRE)

This lecture draws on Donnah’s experiences as an activist working in Ireland with Doras, MASI, and ECIYC to support those who have migrated to Ireland. Additionally, this lecture will share teaching resources written by Dr Brighid Golden which support teachers to explore the topic of migration with pupils in response to evolving global contexts. Resources used include 'Journeys: A Teacher's Handbook Exploring Migration and Migrant Rights in the Primary Classroom' available in both English and Irish and published by the MIC CDU in conjunction with the DICE Project and Doras Luimní, along with 'Forced to Flee: Why Should I Care About Migration and Refugees?' published by Trócaire. Through the lens of lived experiences, Donnah and Brighid will share flexible, adaptable approaches to support the teaching about migration in classrooms.

Register for Discussing migration in Irish classrooms: Strategies and resources for exploring migration with pupils. 

Recordings

Seminar 1: The Place of Music in the Intercultural School

This seminar explores the place and potential of music within diverse schools. Musical participation in Irish primary and post-primary schools is examined as a potential means to develop and enhance belonging, intercultural dialogue and shared understandings. At the same time, the talk also debates the potential for othering and stereotyping through music. The discussion will focus in particular on the opportunities that musical participation can offer to newly arrived children in schools.

The Place of Music in the Intercultural School talk by Dr Ailbhe Kenny

Seminar 2: The Embracing Diversity Nurturing Integration Programme (EDNIP): Sharing learning on developing a model of integration in primary schools

EDNIP is a partnership initiative that works with 5 DEIS Band 1 primary schools to promote and support the integration of migrant children and families into school and community life. Across the 5 schools there are children from 46 different nationalities, speaking 36 languages and from 17 religious backgrounds. This workshop will share key learning and strategies developed from the EDNIP model on promoting integration in primary schools.

The Embracing Diversity Nurturing Integration Programme (EDNIP)
The Embracing Diversity Nurturing Integration Programme (EDNIP)

Seminar 3: Universal Design for Learning: Designing flexible inclusive learning environments for ALL learners

By using the UDL framework educators can accept learner variability as a strength to be leveraged, not a challenge to be overcome. (Rose & Meyer, 2002).  

In this session we will explore everyday technologies through the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) lens to unlock their assistive technology potential. This practical session will support teachers in identifying language supports for ESL students to create fully inclusive environments.

Universal Design for Learning: Designing flexible inclusive learning environments for ALL learners
Universal Design for Learning: Designing flexible inclusive learning environments for ALL learners

Resources

Seminar 2: The Embracing Diversity Nurturing Integration Programme (EDNIP): Sharing learning on developing a model of integration in primary schools

Seminar 2 Presentation Deck

Embracing Diversity Nurturing Integration Project (EDNIP) Report

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